Pete Ware

Tech, NYC & Politics

Category: Fun (page 1 of 3)

This is so me

cartoon

Paris

Faranak with Notre Dame in the background.

DSC_0183.jpg

The New World Order

As I’m breaking old habits of actually getting work done, this puts it all in perspective:
The new world order: aka “New media douchbag”

More pizza

Can’t ever have enough pizza:

[photonic ids=’1363,1364,1365″‘ style=’launch’ fx=’wipe’ slideshow_height=’500′ columns=’3′ thumb_width=’100′ thumb_height=’100′ thumbnail_size=’thumbnail’ slide_size=’medium’ timeout=’4000′ speed=’1000′ ]

I almost know somebody almost, about to be, maybe, famous

From THE INSIDER: RENZO ROSSO – NYLON MAGAZINE

Firefox001.png

But “Aisha Attack”, really?

Making Meals in a Rice Cooker

Hmm, I don’t like making rice and I’m certainly not as vested in it as some (aka F). Perhaps I should try this:

From Making Meals in a Rice Cooker

Shabnam Rezaei, an editor and producer, who grew up in Tehran in
the 1970s and now lives in New York and Vancouver, said that a fundamental
expectation for women in Iran is the ability to make tender, fluffy rice. “There
are all kinds of jokes in Farsi about how women must keep their eyes on the rice
pot or they will not find a husband,” she said. Making Persian rice correctly
requires the cook to rinse and soak the grains, parboil them, dump them out, oil
the pot, put the rice back and steam it, covered with a towel, until tender and
surrounded by a golden crust on the bottom and sides called the tahdig.

It is perhaps not surprising that rice cookers, with a built-in tahdig function,
have become standard in Iran. In a culture where rice is so important, such a
staple, she said, the rice cooker can bring a kind of liberation for women.

Renaissance

I watched an animated movie called Renaissance. It’s the ultimate in film-noir: it’s entirely (except one brief scene with a little color) monochromatic. It’s set in Paris, 2054. I wouldn’t call it Dystopian but the characters inhabit the underside of society and the worse aspects of corporate giants.

Karas is a police detective, more action then words, trying to track down a kidnapped woman. It’s long and complicated. The second viewing is even better because you get to enjoy the story and visuals more.

DVD Player001.png

It’s all shadows, light, and reflections:

DVD Player002.png

Louise Bourgeois

We went to the
Guggenheim
to see
Louise Bourgeois:

Louise Bourgeois is a full-career retrospective of one of the most important artists of our time. This exhibition, which will fill the entire Frank Lloyd Wright rotunda and one adjacent gallery, will be the most comprehensive examination to date of Bourgeoiss long and distinguished career.

Born almost a century ago, Louise Bourgeois has remained steadfastly at the vanguard of the development of contemporary art for more than 70 years, and continues to create new bodies of work with characteristic energy and restless innovation. Throughout a career that has intersected with many of the leading avant-garde movements of the 20th century, including Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Post-Minimalism, she has remained resolutely committed to a singular creative vision.

Sadly, I think I’m just not a sculpture person. I’m like 0 for 5 in sculpture exhibits.

IMG_0079.jpg

IMG_0082.jpg

The Guggenheim is also starting to open up some side galleries. We saw a Kadinsky room. Here’s “Blue Mountain” from 1908.

4D92973E-5172-4301-B7DF-4E9FAF5B5041.jpg

Today in music

Thanks to my son misplacing an adaptor for my earphones to work with my iPhone I had to turn to internet radio for background noise to block out the office chatter. Well, at least it’s giving me something new on my playlist. Trying out 100hitz and the Alternative channel

  • Just listened to Lucinda Williams’s “Righteously”. A bit bluesy, a bit country, a bit rock.
  • How about Korn’s “Freak on a Leash” (MTV unplugged). I’m not normally a Korn person.
Older posts

© 2017 Pete Ware

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑