OpenSuse 11.1, kdm_greet, slow ssh login

I was suffering from slow ssh logins — it’d take 20 seconds to get a login prompt. I noticed this process, kdm_greet, running. Google found a posting message that said the problem is kdm_greet is having to examine a bunch of fonts:
kdm_greet takes a long time to run due to out-of-date font-cache
It didn’t seem reasonable but I went ahead and ran:

fc-cache -f

Login was so fast I thought at first nothing happened.
Well, it started to get slow again. I monitored what was happening and it looks like sshd was taking a long time (30 seconds). That made me think of reverse DNS lookups. I checked

/etc/resolve.conf

and it had an out-of-date nameserver entry. Removed it and things are fast again.

Gmail, Apple Mail, and IMAP

I’d noticed my Apple Mail wasn’t always getting new messages in a timely manner. My iPhone would frequently get it before Mail!

  • Setup gmail, apple mail account as per google’s suggestions
  • These imap settings from google combine how gmail works with Apple’s mail. Read the extra details and the settings make sense.
  • It took 25 minutes to download all the email

While I was at it, I went ahead and setup syncing with google calendar. Recently, Google and Apple improved it so it could be two way:

Finally, it turns out that contact info between Apple’s Address book and gmail (and Yahoo!, for that matter) are doable:

Address Book002.png

WordPress, libxml2 bug

I just upgraded to OpenSuse 11.1 and it’s giving WordPres grief. MarsEdit looses the left angle bracket characters when the article is transmitted via xmlrpc. I don’t have a solution but here’s what’s going on:

I downloaded libxml2-2.7.2 and installed. It didn’t help.

WordPress migration

I switched from blogger, which is the google hosted blogs to my own self hosted blog running WordPress. To be precise, I’m running WPMU or WordPress multi-user.
I did it mostly because my home-brewed website wasn’t being fully utilized. WordPress gave me the basics of what I wanted: provide some static contact, make it easy to link to anything I have under development, and provide the dynamic content (aka blog entries).
Wordpress offers a decent number of themes and lots of ways to customize. I also wanted to be able to upload photos and videos more directly instead of going through Picasa or Fickr.
The migration is easy — you can import directly into WordPress from Blogger. While in WordPress:
I’m not sure what went wrong for me but I lost all the formatting the articles had.
There were some problems with funky characters that caused MarsEdit issues but some editting took care of that.